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A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.

A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
Anegonohama is a “naki-suna (the sand making sounds when people walk on it)” beach, which is rare in the Kyushu region. Formed by raging waves of the Genkainada Sea, it is a fine white sandy beach in a bow-like shape.
It is also famous for the beautiful sunset, which attracts people for a drive. It measures 1.1 km long and approximately 20 m wide and located along Route 202. While people are walking on this bow-shaped beach, the sand makes characteristic sounds created by friction of quartz.
Fukuoka | Nijoshikaka, Itoshima, Fukuoka Prefecture 819-1642
(Updated on: Mar 22, 2017)

It is believed that “naki-suna” sand can be found only on fine clean beaches. The sand makes cute sounds when we walk on it, just like it is singing. In Japan, there used to be about ninety “naki-suna” beaches. Today the number has become much smaller, down to around twenty, which makes them very precious. In Anegonohama, the sand stopped singing once in late 1960’s. However, thanks to strenuous efforts of people in the area (like cleaning projects), the sand started singing again around 1994.
Anegonohama is located on the western edge of Itoshima, close to the border between Fukuoka and Saga. Along the coast, there is the Nijo parking area which has free parking spaces, rest rooms, and a store. In the season of sea bathing, a lot of beachgoers visit this place and the free parking spaces are filled with cars. However, after sunset, you may still enjoy the cool sea breeze with the sound of waves from the quiet beach. It also has the manager office and a tourist information facility.
A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
Source: i.ytimg.com
“Naki-suna” is called “singing sand,” “whistling sand,” or “musical sand” in English. The “naki-suna” in Anegonohama once stopped making sounds, and started again because of the water purification and cleaning projects on the beach. This is a very rare case in Japan. From here, we can watch beautiful islands in the Genkainada Sea, and even the island of Iki in the far distance when the sky is clear. When the sun goes down, the seascape is just superb.
A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
There are some requirements to make the sand sing. First, the sand can't be wet with rain or waves. Even when the sand is dry, it is sometimes hard to tell if the sand is singing while you are walking normally on it. Sliding your feet on the sand makes it easier. If it doesn’t work either, gather dry sand and use your hands as if to squeeze the sand, and you may hear the sand sings. Or, move your hand over the sand hard like sweeping with a broom.
[access] 20-minute walk from JR Shikaka station
A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
In Japana, beaches of Kugunarihama in Miyagi, Kotogahama in Ishikawa, Kotohikihama in Kyoto, and Kotogahama in Shimane are famous as "naki-suna" beaches. There are also some beaches which appear in legends or folktales. We can find “naki-suna” inland too, like deserts and dunes. In deserts, the sand makes sounds when a pile of sand is collapsed by wind.
A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
Source: palett.jp
“Naki-suna” is made from the tiny sands from rivers or coastal cliffs. They reach places where waves are calm, and get polished for a long time until they finally become “naki-suna.” To be “naki-suna,” it is also important for the sand not to move away or to newly come in. It is said that at the place where new sand constantly arrives, it is very hard to find “naki-suna.” In addition, “naki-suna” is vulnerable to the sea pollution and the destruction of nature.
A “naki-suna” beach of Anegonohama in Kyushu; Enjoy the sound of sand on the beach.
As for other countries, Basin Head Beach in Prince Edward Island, Canada, is known for its “naki-suna.” In addition, it is reported that there are thirty-five “naki-suna” sites around the world including the United States.
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